The Nihilistic Implications of Americanism

Looking at ignorance and xenophobic statements of the recent GOP Debates, the struggle between nihilism and existentialism as it relates to Americanism becomes more apparent.  Malcolm X was once quoted saying, “When we open our eyes today and look around America, we see America not through the eyes of someone who have — who has enjoyed the fruits of Americanism, we see America through the eyes of someone who has been the victim of Americanism. We don’t see any American dream; we’ve experienced only the American nightmare. We haven’t benefited from America’s democracy; we’ve only suffered from America’s hypocrisy.”

This is one of the reasons why many African Americans and Latinos are unregistered.  Additionally, new voting suppression laws (presented by the GOP) are disenfranchising minorities even more.  Out of hopelessness births the look at Black existentialism in America.  Out of Black existentialism, births nihilism.  This produces black-on-black crime and other social issues within our community that leads to fueling the prison-industrial complex.  Early effects of Americanism and forcing Africans to assimilate into society post-slavery has a domino-effect that has trickled to this contemporary era.  Assimilation into society post-prison has the exact same effect.  Correctional facilities don’t rehabilitate questioning the motives behind the prison-industrial complex.  There are more African Americans in prison, today, then there were slaves in 1850.

Immigration was a hot-button topic on Tuesday night during the GOP and constantly referred to immigrants as aliens.  Alienation emphasizes a deep sense of alienation.  The U.S. has never spoken highly of “aliens” (Herman Cain suggesting an electric fence along the Mexico/US border).  The Latino community is treated as a separate entity.  From the infrastructure of nihilism produces a deep sense of depression, worthlessness, paranoia, and erosion of one’s culture as to fit the configuration of Americanism.

It’s important that we reject the urge for nihilistic behavior and fulfill what it means to be a minority in America.  Diversity is something to celebrate.  America was founded upon immigration.  Ironically, we uphold the most xenophobic ideals.  We have to think for ourselves and reject inferior ideals eroding our communities.  The “ghetto” is more than a place.  It’s an ideal.  We can transcend mediocrity and stereotypes granted to us by the historical implications of Americanism by thinking for ourselves, providing for ourselves, and defeating nihilism by redefining our existence.  Carter G Woodson said, “If the Negro in the ghetto must eternally be fed by the hand that pushes him into the ghetto, he will never become strong enough to get out of the ghetto.”

-Food for thought

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3 Comments

Filed under Opinion

3 responses to “The Nihilistic Implications of Americanism

  1. I agree with you that modern Black existence is intricately tied to the past. Racism unfortunately informs many of the opportunities that Blacks and Latinos have in this country. That being said however, rehashing the past doesn’t inform the future. Too often we complain about racism but don’t do anything to balance the scales. Moaning about being held down by “the Man” while dropping out of high school, having multiple kids outside marriage, and driving beemers in the hood is contradictory. Certain aspects of the system hold us down because we allow it to do so. I’m glad you added the bit about “transcending mediocrity” because that is exactly what needs to be done in order for us to have equal footing.

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